INFLAMMATION – Causes and Symptoms

Inflammation is part of the body’s immune response. It can be beneficial when, for example, your knee sustains a blow and tissues need care and protection. However, sometimes, inflammation can persist longer than necessary, causing more harm than benefit.

Our immediate reaction to a swelling is to try and decrease it. However, it is important to remember that inflammation is an essential part of the healing process.

The first stage of inflammation is often called irritation, which then becomes inflammation. Inflammation is followed by the discharging of pus. The granulation stage comes next, and new tissue is formed in the wound. Without inflammation, infections and wounds would never heal.

Causes of Inflammation 

Inflammation is caused by a number of physical reactions triggered by the immune system in response to a physical injury or an infection. Inflammation does not necessarily mean that there is an infection, but an infection can cause inflammation.

Types of Inflammation

There are two types of inflammation that differ in how quickly symptoms escalate and how long they last, namely acute inflammation and chronic inflammation.

images-128

An acute inflammation is one that starts rapidly and becomes severe in a short space of time. Signs and symptoms are normally only present for a few days but may persist for a few weeks in some cases. Examples of diseases, conditions, and situations that can result in acute inflammation include:

  • Acute bronchitis
  • Infected ingrown toenail
  • A sore throat from a cold or flu
  • A scratch or cut on the skin
  • High-intensity exercise
  • Acute appendicitis
  • Dermatitis
  • Tonsillitis
  • Infective meningitis
  • Sinusitis
  • A physical trauma

Chronic inflammation on the other hand, takes time and lasts for months or even years. Examples of diseases and conditions that can cause chronic inflammation include :

  • Asthma
  • Chronic peptic ulcer
  • Tuberculosis
  • Rheumatoid arthritis
  • Periodontitis
  • Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease
  • Sinusitis
  • Active hepatitis

Although damaged tissue cannot heal without inflammation, chronic inflammation can eventually cause several diseases and conditions including some cancers, rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, periodontitis, and hay fever.

Symptoms of Inflammation

Symptoms of inflammation vary depending on whether the reaction is acute or chronic. The effects of acute inflammation can be summed up by the acronym PRISH. They include:

  • Pain: The inflamed area is likely to be painful, especially during and after touching. Chemicals that stimulate nerve endings are released, making the area more sensitive.
  • Redness: This occurs because the capillaries in the area are filled with more blood than usual.
  • Immobility: There may be some loss of function in the region of the inflammation.
  • Swelling: This is caused by a buildup of fluid.
  • Heat: More blood flows to the affected area, and this makes it feel warm to the touch.

These five acute inflammation signs only apply to inflammations of the skin. If inflammation occurs deep inside the body, such as in an internal organ, only some of the signs may be noticeable. For example, some internal organs may not have sensory nerve endings nearby, so there will be no pain, such as in certain types of lung inflammation.

Symptoms of chronic inflammation present in a different way. These can include:

  • Fatigue
  • Mouth sores
  • Chest pain
  • Abdominal pain
  • Fever
  • Rash
  • Joint pain

Common treatments for Inflammation

As mentioned earlier in this article, inflammation is part of the healing process. Sometimes, reducing inflammation is helpful, though not always necessary. Possible treatment options include :

1. Anti-inflammatory medications

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can be taken to alleviate the pain caused by inflammation. They counteract an enzyme that contributes to inflammation. This either prevents or reduces pain. Examples of NSAIDs include naproxen, ibuprofen, and aspirin.

Avoid the long-term use of NSAIDs unless advised by a doctor. They increase a person’s risk of stomach ulcers, which can result in severe, life-threatening bleeding. NSAIDs may also worsen asthma symptoms, cause kidney damage, and increase the risk of having a stroke or heart attack.

Acetaminophen, such as paracetamol or Tylenol, can reduce pain without affecting the inflammation. They may be ideal for those wishing to treat just the pain while allowing the healing factor of the inflammation to run its course.

2. Corticosteroids

Corticosteroids, such as cortisol, are a class of steroid hormones that prevent a number of mechanisms involved in inflammation. There are two sets of corticosteroids:

Glucocorticoids: These are prescribed for a range of conditions, including arthritis, temporal arteritis, dermatitis, inflammatory bowel disease (IBS), systemic lupus, hepatitis, asthma, allergic reactions and sarcoidosis. Creams and ointments may be prescribed for inflammation of the skin, eyes, lungs, bowels, and nose.

Mineralocorticoids: These are used to treat cerebral salt wasting, and to replace important hormones for patients with adrenal insufficiency.

The side effects of corticosteroids are more likely if taken by mouth. Taking them with inhalers or injections can reduce the risk. Inhaled medications, such as those used long-term to treat asthma, raise the risk of developing oral thrush. Rinsing the mouth out with water after each use can help prevent oral thrush.

3. Herbs for inflammation

Discuss any possible use of herbal supplements with a doctor.

Harpagophytum procumbens: Also known as devil’s claw, wood spider, or grapple plant, this herb comes from South Africa and is related to sesame plants. Some research has shown it may have anti-inflammatory properties. Various brands are available to purchase online.

Hyssop: This is mixed with other herbs, such as licorice, for the treatment of some lung conditions, including inflammation. The essential oils of hyssop can lead to life-threatening convulsions in laboratory animals. Caution is advised.

Ginger: This has been used for hundreds of years to treat dyspepsia, constipation, colic, and other gastrointestinal problems, as well as rheumatoid arthritis pain. Ginger may be purchased online in supplement form.

Turmeric: Current research is looking into the possible beneficial effects of turmeric in treating arthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, and some other inflammatory conditions. Curcumin, a substance found in turmeric, is being invested for the treatment of several illnesses and disorders, including inflammation. Supplements with turmeric and curcumin are available.

4. Diet

There are several foods that can have been shown to help reduce the risk of inflammation, including olive oil, tomatoes, nuts (such as walnuts and almonds), leafy greens (including spinach and kale), fatty fish, such as salmon and mackerel, and fruits (including blueberries and oranges).

While these dietary solutions do not alone hold the key to controlling inflammation, they can help prime the immune system to react in a measured way.

Avoid eating foods that aggravate inflammation, including:

  • fried foods, including French fries
  • white bread, pastry, and other foods that contain refined carbohydrates
  • soda and sugary drinks
  • red meat
  • margarine and lard

How useful was this post?

/ 5.

Last Updated on

Advertisements

More Posts